Kishimoto Interested In Making a Sonic Game Without Boost

Morio Kishimoto, director of the main-line Sonic series since Colors, was recently asked about the boost mechanic, and he is at least considering… well, not having it at some point.

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NPD List Sonic Frontiers as 16th Best Selling Game of 2022

The open world has closed a lot of sales.

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Iizuka Confirms Second Wave of Sonic Content in 2023, Beyond Frontiers DLC

Every year, Famitsu published brief interviews with various video game developers on their hopes and plans for the coming year. This year, Sonic Team’s Takashi Iizuka was among the 141 devs interviewed, who hinted at what would be in store for Sonic in 2023:

“This past year was the biggest year in Sonic history, including the release of the movie sequel, new titles Sonic Origins and Sonic Frontiers, and the Netflix animation Sonic Prime. We are preparing a second wave to keep the fans happy and maintain that momentum going into 2023. We already announced additional content for Sonic Frontiers, but there is a lot more outside of that, so please look forward to it.”

So it sounds like there is a lot of unannounced Sonic stuff planned for 2023! We already know about a mobile Sonic game currently in development over at SEGA Hardlight. If anything else is coming this year, we’ll know soon enough.

Translation via Gematsu

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Sonic Year in Review 2022: A Banner Year for a New Generation of Sonic

The end of 2022 is now upon us. And boy, what a year it has been! After spending Sonic’s 30th Anniversary mostly waiting for trailers, watching online events and experiencing strange mobile crossovers, it finally feels like this year has been the big global celebration of the blue blur that the decades-long franchise fully deserved.

Continue reading Sonic Year in Review 2022: A Banner Year for a New Generation of Sonic
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Sonic Frontiers Sells 2.5 Million, Becoming One of the Fastest Selling Sonic Games of All Time

SEGA has confirmed that Sonic Frontiers has sold over 2.5 million units worldwide since its release on November 8, making it the best selling Sonic game in more then a decade, despite only being out a month. In fact, Frontiers has already managed to sell 43% of what Sonic games as a whole managed to sell during the entirety of SEGA’s previous fiscal year. What’s more impressive, Frontiers is also among the fastest selling mainline Sonic games of all time.

While old sales data can be difficult to find, it appears Sonic Frontiers is the second-fastest selling Sonic game ever, only sitting behind Sonic the Hedgehog 2, which sold 3.2 million cartridges in two weeks. At the very least, it’s up there.

With numbers like these, Sonic Frontiers is an inarguable success. The next question is whether or not the game will have legs.

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Sonic Frontiers Soundtrack “Stillness & Motion” Releases

December 7th, 2022 marks the release of the Official soundtrack to Sonic Frontiers, “Stillness & Motion”.

The soundtrack will be available as a physical release in Japan for the sum of ¥8,000, and will include a gargantuan library of 150 tracks across 6 CD package:

Additionally, the soundtrack will also be available to listen to via Spotify:

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New Characters, Story and DLC Revealed for Sonic Frontiers in 2023 Content Roadmap

SEGA has announced that Sonic Frontiers will be receiving a whole smorgasbord of new free DLC and story-based content throughout 2023, with a roadmap covering a laundry list of material from small features like photo mode to full-blown playable character arcs.

Via Sonic Twitter

The content will be broken up into three distinct updates, with the first two focusing on additional quality-of-life upgrades to the core Sonic Frontiers experience. Update 1 will consist of a Juke Box and Photo Mode features, with additional Challenge modes for seasoned players. Update 2 will celebrate Sonic’s birthday somehow, introduce new Koco creatures and add an intriguing ‘Open Zone Challenge’ feature.

It’s Content Update 3 that we’re very excited about though – this will apparently feature new playable characters as well as a new story to build upon the events of the core Sonic Frontiers game. We’re assuming this means that Tails, Knuckles and Amy will get their own playable experiences and challenges, but additional story elements are more than welcome too given the ending was one of the weaker elements of the game (per our Sonic Stadium review here).

Best of all, as already mentioned, all of this upcoming content will be free for existing players. To kick things off for the holiday season, SEGA will also be releasing a special free DLC costume pack on December 21st, with the blue blur donning a Christmas suit to rock while busting heads in Cyberspace.

Via Sonic Twitter

Seeing this level of post-release support for a Sonic the Hedgehog game is unheard of; SEGA has previously only dabbled with tiny morsels of DLC in the past, with the most significant being additional ‘Hard mode’ stage variants for Sonic 2006 and challenges for Sonic Unleashed. Sonic Forces offered Super Sonic and Episode Shadow DLC, but this roadmap for Frontiers seems to take things much further than any game before it.

We’re very excited to see what the future holds for the Starfall Islands – if you’ve not already played Sonic Frontiers and want to know what the deal is all about, check out our definitive review right here.

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SEGA’s Rolling Out A Sonic Frontiers Patch Update

It isn’t available on all platforms yet, but Sonic Frontiers is in the middle of receiving its first major patch update. There’s no new content, but there is a large number of bug fixes and performance improvements.

Continue reading SEGA’s Rolling Out A Sonic Frontiers Patch Update
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Sonic Frontiers Marks a Paradigm Shift in Sonic Game Storytelling

Editor’s Note: MASSIVE STORY SPOILERS are in this article.

I loved Sonic game stories when I was a kid. I loved their bigness, the way they gave the game world a sense of history and tragedy. As someone who hadn’t yet played any JRPGs, they were unlike anything I had ever experienced in a game before. It was so cool being taken into the past and seeing Knuckles’ people, the chaos emeralds and the strange creature that once protected them, the young echidna girl who befriended that creature, and the tragic way it all ended. And while Sonic Adventure 2’s story didn’t dig nearly as deep into the world’s past, I loved the tragedy of Shadow, Maria, and Gerald, the mysteriousness surrounding the Ark and its own connections to Chaos and the emeralds, and how it ended with everyone coming together and putting a stop to a sympathetic revenge plot 50 years in the making. That was then, of course.

These days, it’s much more difficult for me to enjoy those stories without rose-tinted glasses. And the stories that came after…never held the same magic for me. Heroes, Shadow, Sonic 06 were all terrible, and on the rare occasion they weren’t (such as the Rush games) they felt smaller. Maybe I was growing out of them, but I think the real answer is far simpler: Sonic’s stories never had cohesion or direction from game to game, and that ultimately caused them to fall apart. But just as Sonic games were hitting what felt like their narrative low point with Sonic the Hedgehog 2006, I was in the midst of being enthralled by Archie Sonic’s newest headwriter: Ian Flynn.

Flynn worked some absolute magic with that comic. I had been a reader since 1995, but by 2006 I had dropped the comics due to my displeasure with where the stories were going. Ian Flynn managed to impress with his very first issue, 160, and from that point on he rarely produced a dud throughout his run. Over the course of a year, he repaired years of damage done to the comic’s narrative. He recontextualized poorly written characterization, retroactively turning it into part of a character’s arc, or using it to fuel drama that simultaneously makes it feel in-character and gives it a satisfying conclusion. Sonic, Tails, and Sally were all major benefactors of this, but nearly everyone in the comic’s cast got a moment.

Archie Tails had been on the receiving end of some bad stories for a few years before this

I hadn’t seen these characters written this well in years, and I felt like I was welcoming old friends home.  “Why can’t the games be written like this?” I began to ask myself, “Why can’t they just hire Ian Flynn?” Extraordinarily, 15 years later, I have finally gotten my wish. And just as I had hoped, Ian Flynn has done the same thing for the games that he did for the comics all those years ago. Sonic and company are back. No, scratch that: they have finally arrived.

Sonic Frontiers is easily the most well-written Sonic game I’ve ever played. The dialogue has that patented Flynn charm, with solid interactions between Sonic and everyone he comes into contact with. We’ve got genuinely funny jokes, extraordinarily well-written heart-felt moments, and an overall tone that can still be light, but is often quite somber. On top of all that, every character aside from Sonic himself gets some sort of arc. 

Character arcs have never really been a strong suit of Sonic games. While they certainly happen, they can often be poorly written and are only occasionally well-executed. That Frontiers has five of them, and that they are  mostly  well done, is certainly a feat. They each leave the characters in a different place from where they’ve been for years, or even decades.

At the start, everyone is more or less where you’d expect them to be. Amy and Tails are tagging along with Sonic, Dr. Eggman is focused purely on his next take-over-the-world scheme, and Knuckles just wants to guard the Master Emerald. Over the course of the game, through their interactions with the Koco and Sonic, Amy, Tails and Knuckles all go through a change. The Kocos, which are essentially spirits of an ancient race trapped and troubled by the struggles they faced before death, act as conduits for character development, their arcs reflecting the struggles of Sonic’s friends.

Amy, who was once long characterized by her one-sided love-affair with Sonic, is driven to help a Koco find their lost love. By the end of it, she sees a love that transcended time, and decides she needs to share her own love with the world by going on her own adventure away from Sonic. Knuckles helps an army of Kocos trying to fight “the enemy.” Upon witnessing the destruction of their civilization he makes the connection between the Koco and his own people’s tragic past. For the first time I can recall, Knuckles expresses genuine regret over his lonely lot in life as the last of his kind. Sonic pulls him out of his funk by reminding him that he’s got his friends, leading to a truly heartfelt conversation that ends in Knuckles deciding to try out Sonic’s more adventurous lifestyle. Finally, we have Tails, who’s Koco…basically experiences Tails’ story in Sonic Forces. Yeah: this game’s story decides to deal with Tails’ worst moments in the franchise.

I think it’s fair to say the games haven’t really done much with Tails since the original Sonic Adventure, which saw him overcoming his fears, facing down Eggman, and saving Station Square from him. Since then…Tails has more or less remained static, rarely leaving Sonic’s side after Sonic Adventure 2 and more or less returning to the “sidekick who follows him around” role. But then we had Forces, where we go from character stagnation to character  regression. Here, Tails “lost it” after Sonic’s defeat and Eggman’s near total takeover of the planet, something which effectively reversed one of the only bits of development Tails ever got. 

So when it came time for Frontiers to give Tails his arc, Flynn pulled the same hat trick that worked so well in Archie: he took Tails’ decades of stagnation, his low point in Forces, and the many times he came through and melded it all together into Tails’ growth into a hero. This all ends up giving him the strongest and most defined arc in the game, and the plot’s best moments. Tails’ entire arc is him dealing with the fact that despite the strides he’s taken to be his own hero, he still messes up and can still fall back into his own comfort zone. Tails essentially experiences imposter syndrome, ignoring everything he’s done to  earn  his place by Sonic’s because all he can think about are his own mistakes.

This just feels so right for Tails, a character who started out as a lonely bullied kid. It makes him feel more human and complex, something I don’t think I’ve ever seen in a Sonic game character before. The best and most interesting character arcs are the messy ones, the ones where characters get to mess up, regress, relearn lessons, and genuinely struggle to become the better version of themselves they want to be. With Tails’ arc put in that context, it effortlessly became the best part of Frontiers’ narrative. And what’s really wild is that this simply wouldn’t be possible without Forces’ terrible, terrible story. 

Outside of Sonic’s friends, the most well-defined arc in this game belongs to Dr. Eggman’s AI creation, Sage. While her arc is pretty thin and the weakest part of the entire game, she is able to do one thing no other Eggman companion has: bring out a different side of him. Indeed, I’d say one of Sonic Frontiers other  major accomplishments is showing us a side of Eggman we’ve only gotten brief glimpses of before within the games.

Dr. Eggman isn’t  just  a guy with designs of world conquest, after all. He is a world class genius, a man of science, history, and engineering. Sonic Frontiers lets us see this other side of him, largely through its unlockable “Egg Memos.” The Egg Memos are the best contributions any game has given to Eggman’s character: he marvels at the Ancient’s technology, figures out the Starfall Islands’ numerous technological and archeological mysteries, develops a fatherly affection for Sage, and he even gives his honest thoughts on Sonic, Amy, Knuckles and Tails. We get to hear him talk himself into accepting that Sage is alive, because of course he is smart enough to create life! He even talks about his cousin Maria, and the jealousy he felt over her being given love from his family that he was denied, despite her being gone. These memos manage to give Eggman more depth than three decades of games ever did.

What’s even better about all this is that it feels very much in character for him. He still often talks about future schemes for world conquest, laughs maniacally, has a  very  high opinion of himself, disregards the insane risks his own plans pose, and even briefly, excitedly contemplates stealing a defenseless Master Emerald before remembering he’s trapped. His affection for Sage and feelings towards Maria and his own family feel like extensions of the Eggman we briefly saw at the end of Sonic Adventure 2, when he reminisced over his Grandpa Gerald and how he inspired him to become a scientist. Eggman was never a man totally incapable of love; it’s just something the games have almost never explored before. 

Unfortunately, as I said before, Sage’s own arc is thin. She shares just three-and-a-half minutes of screentime with Eggman, leaving their relationship feeling a pretty undercooked, though throwing the memos into the mix does help. But Sage’s relationship with Sonic fares a little better, as most of her actual development comes from observing and interacting with him. Sonic has brought many former adversaries into the fold, but Sage is one of the only ones whose change felt somewhat earned by the plot. Sage is consistently surprised by Sonic’s perseverance, moved by his friendships, and over the course of the game her interactions shift from cold indifference, to curiosity, to genuine respect. Unfortunately, the bulk of Sage’s interactions with Sonic still boil down to her telling him resistance is futile and refusing to explain anything to him, which can get a bit repetitive and boring.

Sonic Frontiers is, in many ways, the Sonic game story I’ve been waiting for for decades. It’s got the lore building of the Sonic Adventure games, the quality vocal performances expected of a modern game, and the writing of Flynn-era Archie and IDW comics. It’s still not entirely where I want it to be: Sage’s story is a bit weak, the tone of the story overshoots and is a little too serious and somber, and the lack of a larger cast leaves the world feeling empty. Future games will need to be willing to have longer cutscenes that give non-player characters like Eggman and Sage the screen time they need. They need to more effectively balance darker, more serious scenes with lighter moments and humor. Finally, future games  need  to have a larger cast, with more supporting and secondary characters in a livelier, more populated world. 

Despite these issues, Sonic Frontiers truly feels like the start of a golden era of Sonic game storytelling. The potential this game opens up for future stories has me genuinely excited! Just stick with Ian Flynn, SEGA, and maybe bring other IDW writers like Stanley and Barnes into the mix too. Give Sonic Team the budget to realize a story with even greater scope. Let what’s been built here flourish and grow, and most importantly, follow through on what this game sets up and let these characters change! 

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Sonic Frontiers Is Big, But It Isn’t Very “Open”

I wandered Kronos Island for about three hours, defeating bosses, grinding on rails, and plucking collectables from the map. I periodically stopped at the Elder and the Hermit to convert my stash into gains, then popped over to an Amy or Sage point to get a few lines of characters self-reflecting. When I defeated the Titan of the region, I had to acknowledge a feeling that had been nagging me the whole time: “Is that all there is?”

Continue reading Sonic Frontiers Is Big, But It Isn’t Very “Open”
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Japan Charts: Sonic Frontiers Becomes Fastest-Selling Mainline Game in 20 Years

Sonic Frontiers has smashed series sales records in Japan, with today’s Famitsu charts reporting that the blue blur’s latest adventure has racked up a total of 46,276 unit sales across all platforms. It’s the highest a Sonic game has ever sold in its opening week since Sonic Adventure 2’s original release on the Dreamcast.

Continue reading Japan Charts: Sonic Frontiers Becomes Fastest-Selling Mainline Game in 20 Years
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Sonic Frontiers To Receive Multiple Free Content Updates Into 2023

Sonic Frontiers’ Monster Hunter DLC pack will be the first of several free downloadable content packs for the game. This news comes via a German language press release from PLAION, the PR firm that works for SEGA Europe, which confirmed that these DLC releases will continue into 2023.

The exact nature of these content updates have not been clarified, but the Japanese version of the game has already received downloadable content that includes a collaboration with Hololive Vtuber Inugami Korone and an emote animation that lets Sonic pretend to play football with the Koco.

You can find the full press release here.

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Digital Foundry Tests the Performance of EVERY Version of Sonic Frontiers

Digital Foundry, the internet’s prominent game graphics and performance testing site, recently went hands on with every major console version of Sonic Frontiers, including the Switch and each major hardware step of the Playstation 4/5 and Xbox X/S/One.

Continue reading Digital Foundry Tests the Performance of EVERY Version of Sonic Frontiers
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Sonic Frontiers Monster Hunter DLC Out Now

The Monster Hunter DLC for Sonic Frontiers is now available across all platforms! The DLC is free, and contains the Rathalos and Felyne Rathalos armor, as well as a meat cooking mini game. The mini game can be accessed via Big the Cat’s fishing spots.

Check out some video footage below:

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Sonic Frontiers Smashes Series Record for Concurrent Players on Steam

Boy, it seems like people were really eager to play Sonic Frontiers! The game has reportedly smashed the record for most concurrent players for a Sonic the Hedgehog game on PC platform Steam.

Continue reading Sonic Frontiers Smashes Series Record for Concurrent Players on Steam
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What I Want From Sonic Frontiers DLC

Sonic as a franchise has always been…strangely averse to DLC. In an era where a lot of single-player games can get loads of post-launch content, SEGA has remained rather stingy when it comes to Sonic. Maybe we get some level packs reusing in-game assets, or cosmetics, or if we’re really lucky, some new characters or a couple brand new levels, but we’ve never really gotten anything substantial, even when you’d think a game was built for it. I mean, who wouldn’t have wanted more classic levels re-imagined in Sonic Generations or Sonic Mania?

Continue reading What I Want From Sonic Frontiers DLC
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How Sonic Frontiers (Mostly) Gets Sonic Combat Right

Sonic has a…messy history with combat. Starting with Sonic Heroes, the franchise has made multiple attempts to make Sonic work in more combat-oriented games, often with disastrous results. Theoretically, having the player stop to fight enemies during a stage could be an effective way to add some variety to the gameplay while also extending playtime. In practice, however, focus on combat has served to do little more than break the pace of of any game they’re in, by forcing the player to stop and fight hordes of enemies with underbaked combat mechanics before they can progress. 

Sonic Frontiers is the first mainline Sonic game in more than a decade to have a focus on combat. Starting with Sonic Unleashed, Sonic Team (wisely) began to excise combat from Sonic’s platforming stages. By Sonic Colors, nary an enemy lifebar could be found outside of boss encounters, and that was how Sonic Team kept it until, well, now. As Sonic Frontiers seeks to yet again redefine what a Sonic game is, combat has again taken center stage, and for the first time ever…it is genuinely satisfying.

Sonic Frontiers gets a lot right in its combat: it’s polished, discourages button mashing, has solid defensive options, makes use of Sonic’s speed, let’s Sonic feel powerful, looks cool, and most importantly it feels good to play. At its most basic, mashing the X-button for Sonic’s basic combo gets the job done, at least for the easiest enemies. But as enemies become more complex in their capabilities and moves, that very quickly becomes not enough.

Aside from the basic combo, I personally like to divide Sonic’s combat options into four categories: offensive, defensive, ranged, and flashy. “Flashy” moves generally just add some visual variety and power to Sonic’s basic combo, such as the phantom rush (which happens automatically when the combo bar fills up) and wild rush. Ranged moves, like sonic boom, are good for hitting enemies from a distance while staying out of range of some of their attacks, and is good against enemies with area attack moves. 

The cyloop is the game’s offensive move: it allows you to quickly tear down enemy defenses, or delivery damage to multiple enemies without needing to hit them. It’s required for certain, defensive-centric enemies. Later, you can unlock an “auto-cyloop” which lets you pull off cyloops in the middle of combos to quickly take down a single enemy’s defense. Finally, we have the defensive moves: the dodge and the parry. The parry is easy to pull off, and can even be done in mid-air: just hold L1 & R1 and when the enemy attacks you’ll deflect them automatically. Dodges, meanwhile, let you avoid attacks all together, and when timed correctly, allow Sonic to dodge an attack, and move in quickly to deliver a combo attack. While there are certain situations which require these moves, the way you use these moves can also effect your overall playstyle.

For instance, if you like to play offensively and risky, like I do, you can use the cyloop a lot to not just take down enemy defenses, but keep them vulnerable to combos while delivering damage. However, using the cyloop can leave you vulnerable to attack, which can make a fight harder if you make a mistake. Cyloops can also interrupted by uneven terrain, or by area attacks, making it difficult or impractical in certain situations. Likewise, focusing on dodging and parrying, and only pulling off cyloops or combos when an enemy gives you an opening, can be easier, but also slower.

What I appreciate about Frontiers’ combat is that it gives you a decent amount of variety. It forces you to use all of its required moves, while also leaving you room for variety and strategy in how you approach any given enemy encounter. It feels like, for the first time ever, Sonic Team has genuinely put a lot of thought into how Sonic should fight. Even better: the encounters with the non-boss enemies are often quite short, once you rise above the base levels, meaning that combat rarely feels like a slog. And since it’s mostly optional, with none of the infamous enemy rooms of past games, you are largely free to set your own pace.

So the combat has variety, some amount of depth, and FEELS GOOD. So why do I say “mostly?” Well…much like Frontiers as a whole, while the combat is a lot of fun, it also feels like the foundation for something better. While I’m not a huge fan of the Unleashed werehog, it does get one thing right about its combat: it maps two separate kinds of attacks to different buttons, which can be used for a multitude of combos. I don’t really think Frontiers needs anything on the level of the werehog, but somewhere between that and where it is now would be a good sweet spot for the game’s combat, I think. More depth, to keep things from getting repetitive, but not so much so that the combat becomes too dense for people who are here for the platforming action and open world. It seems pretty clear that one goal with the combat was accessibility, since there’s even an unlockable autocombo option for more casual players.

As it stands, Frontiers has the most enthralling combat system I’ve ever experienced in a Sonic game. It blew away my (admittedly low) expectations, and I look forward to seeing what future Sonic games do with these mechanics. While I do think there is some value in keeping the combat more simplistic then, say, Bayonetta (this game doesn’t need to be an outright brawler), I do hope Sonic Team expands on this game’s combat with new moves and more complex combos in the future. Good on you, Sonic Team, you finally made Sonic combat fun! I will no longer look upon an enemy lifebar with dread.

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Official ‘Sonic Frontiers’ Premium Wall Art On Sale 9 November

Sonic Frontiers is finally here, and UK-based art gallery Moor Art is teaming up with SEGA to celebrate, by offering a number of limited edition set of premium wall arts featuring the game’s key artwork.

Continue reading Official ‘Sonic Frontiers’ Premium Wall Art On Sale 9 November
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TSS REVIEW: Sonic Frontiers

They say that a work of art tends to be a reflection of the thoughts and feelings of the artist who made it. If that’s the case, then Sonic Team has been a studio seemingly crushed with anxiety for the last five years, because Sonic Frontiers is a game uncharacteristically drenched in melancholy, introspection and sadness.

From the wistful empty fields and abandoned temples of Kronos Island, to the hauntingly isolationist undertones of the soundtrack and even the narratives driving Sonic and his friends (no spoilers here, don’t worry), there’s something strangely unsettling about the vibe of Sonic Frontiers.

Continue reading TSS REVIEW: Sonic Frontiers
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SEGA Releases Ares Island Studio Recording and Tomoya Ohtani Interview Videos

With Sonic Frontiers’ release inching ever closer, SEGA has yet another sampling of the OST, this time highlighting Ares Island, and an interview with the man behind this and many other modern Sonic soundtracks.

Continue reading SEGA Releases Ares Island Studio Recording and Tomoya Ohtani Interview Videos
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Knuckles Investigates a Precursor Civilization in Sonic Frontiers Prologue: Divergence

After much anticipation, today marks the release of Sonic Frontiers Prologue: Divergence, a Knuckles-focused animated short announced during the most recent Sonic Central presentation.

The short focuses on Knuckles in an introspective moment as he contemplates his own isolation. With surprising directness, the story ties itself to the events of Sonic Adventure, as well as the precursor civilizations that exist on the fringes of Sonic lore. For Sonic continuity buffs, the short certainly suggest that the tendrils of the Starfall Islands have a very wide, very old reach.

As with Sonic Frontiers proper, the short was written by Ian Flynn with consulting from Evan Stanley, with the animation itself handled once again by Tyson Hesse and Powerhouse Animation Studio. Dave Mitchell returns as Knuckles, though with significantly more nuanced dialog than in his prior performance in Team Sonic Racing. And to round out the veritable who’s who of official Sonic projects, Tee Lopes composed the short’s original music.

Divergence gives a much heartier taste of Sonic Frontiers’ story than Prologue: Convergence and plays into the tone that Frontiers on the whole has established. This isn’t pure goofball Knucklehead, but the short strikes a balance of not being overly serious either. It builds itself upon the existing Sonic world, both classic and modern, while seeding Frontiers’ own mysteries.

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Frontiers Gets Symphonic with a Medley from Brazil Game Show 2022

Following on the Sonic 30th Anniversary Symphony last year, the official Sonic YouTube has shared a new performance from Brazil Game Show 2022, featuring a medley of Sonic Frontiers themes.

Continue reading Frontiers Gets Symphonic with a Medley from Brazil Game Show 2022
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Sonic’s Moved 1.51 Billion Game Sales and Downloads (If You Include Mobile)

How many hedgehogs does it take to maintain a 30-year-old multimedia franchise? At least 1.51 billion according to SEGA Sammy’s latest 2022 Integrated investor report, spread across physical and digital game units and mobile downloads.

Continue reading Sonic’s Moved 1.51 Billion Game Sales and Downloads (If You Include Mobile)
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Read the Conclusion of the Sonic Frontiers: Convergence Comic

The second part of the official Sonic Frontiers prologue has dropped, leaving fans with the perfect cliffhanger to excite them ahead of the release of the latest Sonic video game on November 8.

Continue reading Read the Conclusion of the Sonic Frontiers: Convergence Comic
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IGN Offers “Final Preview” of Sonic Frontiers and a New Island

Closing out their pre-release coverage of Frontiers, IGN returns this morning with one additional preview of the game’s PC version, including details on general game progression, the “Memory Tokens” to collect, Cyber Space level motifs, and some fresh footage of the game’s third island.

Continue reading IGN Offers “Final Preview” of Sonic Frontiers and a New Island
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Kishimoto Confirms Sonic Frontiers Development Has Been Completed

The director of the upcoming Sonic Frontiers has announced on Twitter that the game has officially gone gold, with development now completed across all platforms.

Continue reading Kishimoto Confirms Sonic Frontiers Development Has Been Completed
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SEGA and Audi Are Selling This One-of-a-Kind Sonic Frontiers Racing Car

The age-old tradition of Sonic the Hedgehog game promotional cars has come back with a vengeance this year, as SEGA Japan revealed this customised Audi R8 Coupe V10 – and it’s going to go on sale later this year for some $300k USD.

Continue reading SEGA and Audi Are Selling This One-of-a-Kind Sonic Frontiers Racing Car
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Data Discs Announces Sonic Frontiers 2LP and 4LP Vinyl Soundtrack

Sonic Frontiers will be getting a special vinyl soundtrack release in December, with pre-orders going live this weekend. Titled Sonic Frontiers: The Music of Starfall Islands, the soundtrack will come in both 2LP and 4LP limited edition box sets.

Continue reading Data Discs Announces Sonic Frontiers 2LP and 4LP Vinyl Soundtrack
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Read the First Chapter of the Sonic Frontiers: Convergence Comic

It only got announced last week, but already the first part of the official Sonic Frontiers prologue comic, Convergence, has been published. You can read it right here to get a sense of the journey that Sonic, Tails, Amy and Eggman take that leads to their situation at the start of the Sonic Frontiers video game.

Continue reading Read the First Chapter of the Sonic Frontiers: Convergence Comic
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Two-Part Sonic Frontiers Prologue Comic, ‘Convergence’, Releasing Digitally Next Week

SEGA has just announced a brand new digital comic that will be released to promote the upcoming release of Sonic Frontiers. Titled ‘Sonic Frontiers: Convergence’, the two-part comic series will begin this coming Tuesday, with the official Sonic channel revealing the ‘book’s cover art today.

Continue reading Two-Part Sonic Frontiers Prologue Comic, ‘Convergence’, Releasing Digitally Next Week
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Free Monster Hunter DLC Hits Sonic Frontiers in November

After multiple iterations of Sonic collaborations hitting the Monster Hunter series, the reverse finally has finally happened.

Continue reading Free Monster Hunter DLC Hits Sonic Frontiers in November
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Sonic Frontiers Soundtrack “Stillness & Motion” Announced for December 8

Sonic Channel has revealed that Wavemaster will be releasing a Sonic Frontiers original soundtrack, titled “Stillness & Motion.” The massive 6-disc set will include 150 songs from the game and a 40-page insert book with commentary. The physical CD was only announced for Japan; however, the digital album will be available internationally on major music services. Both will release December 8 (or December 7 according to the official Japanese Sonic Twitter account).

The blog post notes that the game’s main theme “I’m Here,” composed by series mainstay Tomoya Ohtani and written/performed by Merry Kirk-Holmes (To Octavia), will be included on the album, though the game’s other theme “Vandalize” by ONE OK ROCK was not explicitly mentioned (if it does not make it to the album, it’s otherwise available on the band’s new album “Luxury Disease”). The post estimates the price to launch at 8,000 yen (a little over $55 USD at time of writing).

From what we’ve heard so far, Frontiers’ melancholy tone is backed by subdued and atmospheric overworld music, while cyberspace stages such as Green Hill, Chemical Plant, and Sky Sanctuary invoke a style similar to that of Sonic Forces, complete with vocal elements. Sonic Frontiers is scheduled to release November 8, when we can finally stop relying on off-screen demo audio and enjoy the game’s music properly.

Thanks to Dodger24848 and MyEcho for the news tip!

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SOAP-Style Grinding Shoes Return as a Promo Item for Frontiers

As encouragement to get people to sign up for the Sonic Frontiers newsletter, SEGA is offering an unusual treat: Sonic’s grinding shoes from Sonic Adventure 2.

By subscribing to the game’s newsletter by January 31, 2023, you’ll receive an e-mail after the game’s release to redeem for the in-game shoes. Like Forces and Colors: Ultimate, Sonic Frontiers is expected to offer cosmetics for your character, including some as part of the game’s Digital Deluxe Edition, and Japan exclusive promo cosmetics in collaboration with vTuber Inugami Korone.

While fans online have been ecstatic over this announcement, I feel like it was a real missed opportunity to include the OVA outfit, the Mii kigurumi outfits from the Olympic games, or, perhaps the best Sonic cosmetic SEGA has ever released…

Thanks to Dodger24848 for the news tip!

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Sonic Team Reveals New Animated Studio Logo

Alongside the latest TGS Trailer for Sonic Frontiers last week, Sonic Team revealed a new animated logo bump. The 5-second clip shows the titular blue streak collecting rings as the trail forms the Sonic Team logo.

In an official blog post on Sonic Channel, producer and creative director Kazuyuki Hoshino optimistically touts the studio’s staff and legacy:

The Sonic Team is full of energy and motivation, consisting of veteran team members, who have been here for a long, long time, and newcomers bringing in their own fresh take on things. These talented groups of people are able to come together to make this team even stronger. We want our fans to know that when they see this logo, they are guaranteed to get a good game from Sonic Team.

This follows Sonic Frontiers’ director Morio Kishimoto hoping that the upcoming game bolsters the reputation of the studio. Confidence in Sonic Team has long been shaky within the fan community and especially outside of it. With Kishimoto approaching Frontiers as a generational shift in Sonic games, there is no time more pivotal for the studio to prove that its internal confidence is justified.

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Frontiers’ Titan Boss Fights Will Require Super Sonic

While long-prior tradition once dictated that thou shalt fight the biggest boss at the end of the game as Super Sonic, Sonic Frontiers is once again shaking things up. As we reported last week, the latest TGS trailer teased Titan battles, pitting Sonic against towering bosses. In an interview with IGN Japan, director Morio Kishimoto confirms that these fights do require transforming into Super Sonic.

“Up until now, in Sonic games, Super Sonic would only appear against the last boss. Imagine if the first boss in Sonic Frontiers is as strong as those bosses,”

The TGS trailer shows Sonic scaling the massive enemy in order to take the Chaos Emerald housed on its head, using all seven to transform, and then flying towards the enemy. While no combat is shown, IGN notes that the Super Sonic fights have their own moveset separate from the standard traversal and combat mechanics.

The franchise has taken different approaches to Super Sonic from Sonic Colors onward, some games requiring the seven emeralds to fight a final boss as Super Saiyan Sonic, others using that form as a reward for completing extra challenges, and even Sonic Forces offering him as free DLC. It’s interesting to see Frontiers’ take as adding further variety to the game’s combat encounters, bucking yet further modern Sonic trends.

Thanks to SSF1991 for the tip!

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TSS PREVIEW: Sonic Frontiers Impressions – Cautiously One Ok Rock-timistic

Sonic Frontiers represents the biggest shake-up of the Sonic the Hedgehog game franchise for over twenty years. So naturally, there has been a lot of apprehension from fans about the project since its announcement – especially as Sonic Team has built up a reputation of switching focus with each of its mainline titles since 2001.

Everybody is desperate to finally get a series of Sonic titles that establish (and maintain) a consistent visual, gameplay and narrative design. Will Sonic Frontiers be the start of a brand new branch/generation of Sonic games? Sonic Team has gone on record to say that is their intention. After playing a brief demo of the game at Gamescom last month, I’m cautiously optimistic enough to agree. With some reservations.

Continue reading TSS PREVIEW: Sonic Frontiers Impressions – Cautiously One Ok Rock-timistic
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