Smooth McGroove Releases a Lovely A-capella Rendition of Sonic 2’s Emerald Hill Zone


Sonic the Hedgehog 2 introduced a number of staples in the Sonic series since it first launched in 1992: the Spin Dash ability, a seventh Chaos Emerald and subsequent Super transformation, the two-tailed fox Miles “Tails” Prower as the Blue Blur. Aside from its prequel, Sonic 2 was the highest selling game on the Mega Drive/Genesis, having sold over 6 million copies on its initial run, and cementing SEGA’s status as a successful and legitimate threat to Nintendo and their plumber mascot.

Like Sonic 1, the sequel title was scored by Dreams Come True musician, Masato Nakamura, and a number of the game’s most memorable songs still resound with fans to this day.

Smooth McGroove, renowned on YouTube for his faithful a-capella covers of video game music, uploaded his mesmerizing rendition of the introductory stage of Sonic 2, Emerald Hill Zone.

McGroove previously covered Chemical Plant Zone from the same game, and Sonic 3‘s Ice Cap Zone Act 1, as well as Sonic 1‘s Green Hill Zone, Marble Zone, and Star Light Zone.

No Mash-Up Monday this week, but if you have any Sonic music mash-up suggestions for next week, you can either share your suggestions in the comments section below, or you can reach me via any of the following to see your choice next Monday:

Soundtrack Review – Sonic Generations: Blue Blur & Anniversary Releases

Soundtrack collectors have had their pockets rinsed dry over the last year with the release of a whole plethora of Sonic albums to sate the appetites of those looking for the sounds of the old and new.

Continue reading Soundtrack Review – Sonic Generations: Blue Blur & Anniversary Releases

Sonic 1&2 Soundtrack Releases in Japan

Masato Nakamura’s Sonic the Hedgehog 1&2 Soundtrack was released in Japan on Wednesday.

As part of Sega’s 20th Anniversary celebration-cum-cash-in, this new soundtrack is three discs big. While the first contains the same old tracks we’ve heard a jillion times, the second disc has the never-before-released original demo tapes of all the games’ tracks. The Dreams Come True bassist reportedly sent these tapes via snail mail to Sega to be sequenced into the games.

The third disc is a mini-album containing Sweet Sweet Sweet from Dreams Come True’s hugely successful The Swinging Star album, better known as the ending theme in Sonic the Hedgehog 2, as well as its English version, Sweet Dreams. They’re accompanied by the equivalent themes produced by Akon for the Sonic the Hedgehog soundtrack in 2006.

The Sonic the Hedgehog 1&2 Soundtrack is available to import from Play-Asia and CDJapan. There’s no news yet whether it’ll see a release in the West, however.

Sonic the Hedgehog 1 & 2 Soundtrack Available for Preorder

Although news on it’s release has been pretty sketchy, it now finally looks like the Sonic the Hedgehog 1 & 2 soundtrack will be seeing the light of day this October.

With distribution through the Universal Music (the record label of Japanese super group Dreams Come True to which the original composer Masato Nakamura belongs), the soundtrack is set to contain the full workings from the Megadrive / Genesis titles, along with unheard demo material all reworked.

You can preorder this soundtrack now through Play-Asia for $36.49 (about £27) and CDJapan for ¥3000 (about £26), and you will be pleased to know they will ship to most countries worldwide. The soundtrack is set to be released on 19th of October 2011.

Although no announcement of track listings or box art has been confirmed, the price would indicate that this may be a double-CD soundtrack [EDIT – Sonic Retro claim it comes on a massive 3 CDs with 88 tracks -T] , although again this is speculative; we will keep you informed as always through the Sonic Stadium as more information comes to light.

PREORDER: Play-Asia, CDJapan

Sonic the Hedgehog 1 & 2 Commemorative 20th Anniversary Soundtrack Announced

Masato Nakamura, the mastermind behind the original Sonic the Hedgehog and Sonic the Hedgehog 2 soundtracks and member of the popular Japanese super-band DREAMS COME TRUE will be producing a commemorative CD soundtrack to be released over the summer.

Not only will the soundtrack contain songs taken from the first two Sonic the Hedgehog titles for the SEGA Megadrive/Genesis, it will also include a reprint of the original sound demo tapes from both games, along with other bonus tracks yet to be announced.

This will surely be a must-have item for every fan amongst the community, let alone videogame music connoisseurs. Similar to the Sonic Adventure, Sonic Adventure 2 and Sonic Heroes re-release soundtracks, this CD album looks set to only be available to Japan.

Sonic Stadium will keep you up to date as we learn more about this fantastic compilation!

Original story taken from Japanese Famitsu Webpage

Sega interviews Masato Nakamura

Sega of Japan conducted an interview with Masato Nakamura of the Japanese band: ‘Dreams Come True’. Dreams Come True has been a popular band in Japan for some time now, their second album: ‘The Swinging Star’ (released November 14, 1992) was the first to sell over 3 million copies in Japan.

But even before Dreams Come True’s success one company realised the bands potential, and that company was Sega. Sega employed Masato Nakamura to compose the music for ‘Sonic the Hedgehog’ and then again for ‘Sonic the Hedgehog 2’. In return SEGA offered sponsorship to Dreams Come True, and Sega began promoting Sonic through them.

Sega of America have translated that interview, and it gives an interesting insight to the development of the games soundtrack. It’s interesting to note that while Masato was composing music for both Sonic 1 and Sonic 2, he was also recording the Dreams Come True albums: ‘Million Kisses’ and ‘The swinging Star’, which would explain why certain songs from each album were inspired by themes from the game. For instance the song ‘Sweet Sweet Sweet’ from the album ‘The Swinging Star’ is a lyrical interpretation of the ending theme from Sonic 2.

The interview is as follows: Continue reading Sega interviews Masato Nakamura